Caliber Pulse

Trends, tips and data for your marketing, public relations and social media strategies written by the experts at The Caliber Group, a firm based in Tucson, Arizona that's specializing in building and maintaining successful brands, relationships and reputations

There could be an ‘app’ for your business or organization

There’s a app for that,” the simple, iconic tagline from the iPhone commercials, could apply to your business. An application — or an “app” when speaking Apple-ese — specific to your business or organization could be a valuable addition to your marketing cache.

The iPhone app created for the Tucson Festival of Books gave a quick, concise look at the festival events with a flick of the iPhone. The festival, Arizona’s largest literary event held March 13-14, attracted an estimated 70,000-80,000 bibliophiles to the University of Arizona campus to meet and mingle with about 450 authors who spoke and signed books.

A user review on the iTunes store Web site described the festival’s app as: “The perfect use of a small application to fill a need for those of us who don’t like carrying around newspaper-sized schedules of events. Very well done!” The free application was downloaded more than 625 times. It was updated with a slide show and video of the 2010 festival.

“It’s a lot of work, but worth it,” said developer Rob Wisner of the Arizona Daily Star, a festival sponsor.

Creating an iPhone application requires time and programming ability. First, the developer must apply, pay a fee and be approved by Apple. iPhone applications are written in an uncommon computer language, Objective-C, which can be overwhelming. And there is a fee to have the app in the iTunes store, which determines if you are going to distribute your apps in the iTunes store, $99/year, or in your enterprise, $299/year.

You can see screen shots and download the Tucson Festival of Books app at the iTunes store and you can learn more about how to develop an app at the iPhone Dev Center.

A simpler option is creating a Web application that’s designed for the small screen and mobile devices, suggests Wisner. The programming language is more common — HTML and JavaScript — no approvals are required and the applications will work on a BlackBerry, a Droid and other smart phones.

Apple estimates that there are more than 140,000 iPhone applications, from simple to sublime, such as:

  • A virtual rosary-beads app allows the user to pray the rosary with animated beads moved with a touch. Corresponding prayers and devotional images pop up on the screen.
  • Apparel-maker Dockers created an ad for users to interact with its ad using the phone’s accelerometer. Users shook the phone and an urban street dancer performed in a pair of Dockers. The ad appeared in iPhone games, including iBasketball, iGolf and iBowl, according to AdAge.com.
  • The Gap had a holiday app that allowed people to mix-and-match outfits with the swipe of a finger, according to AdAge.com.
  • You could shop for Target holiday gifts by shaking a virtual snow globe.

Before you call your IT department or a Web designer, look at other iPhone and mobile applications, decide what (if any) type of app would work for your business. Your app could be a search of a data base, such as the book festival’s site, a game or give information. Above all, your app needs to be creative, fill a need or offer something not available elsewhere and serve a marketing and information need for your business or organization.

There are a bazillion Web sites offering iPhone and mobile device application development advice. Proceed cautiously but optimistically.

The third Tucson Festival of Books will be March 12-13, 2011, on the UA campus. And yes, there will be an app for that.

(Thanks to Laughing Squid for the photo)

There could be an ‘app’ for your business or organization

“There’s a app for that,” the simple, iconic tagline from the iPhone commercials, could apply to your business. An application — or an “app” when speaking Apple-ese — specific to your business or organization could be a valuable addition to your marketing cache.

The iPhone app created for the Tucson Festival of Books gave a quick, concise look at the festival events with a flick of the iPhone. The festival, Arizona’s largest literary event held March 13-14, attracted an estimated 70,000-80,000 bibliophiles to the University of Arizona campus to meet and mingle with about 450 authors who spoke and signed books.

A user review on the iTunes store Web site described the festival’s app as: “The perfect use of a small application to fill a need for those of us who don’t like carrying around newspaper-sized schedules of events. Very well done!”

The free application was downloaded more than 625 times. It was updated with a slide show and video of the 2010 festival.

“It’s a lot of work, but worth it,” said developer Rob Wisner of the Arizona Daily Star, a festival sponsor.

Creating an iPhone application requires time and programming ability. First, the developer must apply, pay a fee and be approved by Apple. iPhone applications are written in an uncommon computer language, Objective-C, which can be overwhelming. And there is a fee to have the app in the iTunes store. (There is only one fee which determines if you are going to distribute your apps in the iTunes store, $99/year, or in your enterprise, $299/year)

You can see screen shots and download the Tucson Festival of Books app at the iTunes store, at the iTunes store http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/tucson-festival-of-books/id355559216?mt=8 and you can learn more about how to develop an app at the iPhone Dev Center

http://developer.apple.com/iphone/index.action

A simpler option is creating Web application designed for the small screen and mobile devices, suggests Wisner. The programming language is more common — HTML and JavaScript — no approvals are required and the applications will work on a BlackBerry, a Droid and other smart phones.

Apple estimates that there are more than 140,000 iPhone applications, from simple to sublime, such as:

• A virtual rosary-beads app allows the user to pray the rosary with animated beads moved with a touch. Corresponding prayers and devotional images pop up on the screen.

• Apparel-maker Dockers created an ad for users to interact with its ad using the phone’s accelerometer. Users shook the phone and an urban street dancer performed in a pair of Dockers. The ad appeared in iPhone games, including iBasketball, iGolf and iBowl, according to AdAge.com

• The Gap had a holiday app that allowed people to mix-and-match outfits with the swipe of a finger, according to AdAge.com.

• You could shop for Target holiday gifts by shaking a virtual snow globe.

Before you call your IT department or a Web designer, look at other iPhone and mobile applications, decide what (if any) type of app would work for your business. Your app could be a search of a data base, such as the book festival’s site, a game or give information. Above all, your app needs to be creative, fill a need or offer something not available elsewhere and serve a marketing and information need for your business or organization.

There are a bazillion Web sites offering iPhone and mobile device application development advice. Proceed cautiously but optimistically.

The third Tucson Festival of Books will be March 12-13, 2011, on the UA campus. And yes, there will be an app for that.

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April 15, 2010 - Posted by | Marketing Trends, Mobile Marketing | , ,

1 Comment »

  1. Nice Blog dude 😀 , Bookmarked !!

    Comment by laurentiu | April 17, 2010 | Reply


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